About Franklin West SU

School District in Fairfax, Fletcher, Georgia, VT. Apple Distinguished Program. League of Innovative Schools. "A belief in what is possible."

The FWSU Story: Senior Spotlight – Celebrating BFA Class of 2020

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All BFA Fairfax Seniors were invited to participate in a virtual interview for the blog. Today we are happy to celebrate graduating senior, Owen Senesac!

When did you start school at BFA?
I started in 2007. 

What is your favorite memory about your time at BFA?
My 6th Grade class trip where my grade went to a suspended obstacle course.

What are your plans after graduation?
I will spend 3 years at Castleton University studying business.  

Do you want to give a “shout-out” to one of your teachers? Who and why?
Mrs. Skerrett! She was the coach of GEO BEE team, which is quite possibly the best after-school club. 

What are you learning about other people (both close others and not-so-close others) as a result of the present situation? 
I’ve learned that people (or at least me) enjoy the simple things associated with everyday routines, like a walk or a morning conversation.

What new learning and new perspectives have you gained, and how will you integrate them into your life moving forward?
Through watching and reading news and articles I see that life can be a lot worse than missing graduation, prom, etc. So moving forward, I will be much more thankful for the simpler things I have.

Linda Keating is the Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment at Franklin West Supervisory Union. She is a regular contributor to THE FWSU STORY. You can follow her on Twitter @Educate4ward

The FWSU Story: Senior Spotlight – Celebrating BFA Class of 2020

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All BFA Fairfax Seniors were invited to participate in a virtual interview for the blog. Today we are happy to celebrate graduating senior, Madison Fitzgerald!

When did you start school at BFA?
I started school at BFA in preschool. I’ve been at this school my entire life!

What is your favorite memory about your time at BFA?
My favorite memories will always be the Fall Musicals. I was in the musicals ever since the sixth grade, and I loved them. They definitely had an impact on myself as an actor and as a whole. It taught me to get out of my shell and essentially be myself.

What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation, I am attending Champlain College in Burlington as a Game Art major.

Do you want to give a “shout-out” to one of your teachers? Who and why?
This is very hard, since I loved all my teachers. I’d have to say Mr. Lane! He has always been there to help me and I feel like I can talk to him as a friend and mentor rather than a teacher. He loves what he teaches, you can always tell! He gives very good insight and has helped me become both a better builder in Set Design and a better person overall. You can always sit down and have an engaging conversation about anything with him.

What are things that are bringing you some joy/fun (e.g. activities, hobbies, experiences) during this period? Why do you think that is?
I have been drawing, doing embroidery, and Animal Crossing! I’ve always been super creative and loved art. That’s why I’m continuing it in college. As for Animal Crossing, the game is just very wholesome and it’s fun to create your own little island. 

Which people/relationships are helping you through this time? 
My family, friends, and boyfriend have been helping me greatly! They are very good listeners, and always come to help when I am in need. Sometimes it is hard to keep in touch despite COVID-19 due to work and such, but we still manage! They come through with animal videos when I need them most. It’s been hard for all of us, but we’re in this together.

Linda Keating is the Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment at Franklin West Supervisory Union. She is a regular contributor to THE FWSU STORY. You can follow her on Twitter @Educate4ward

The FWSU Story: Senior Spotlight -Celebrating BFA Class of 2020

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All BFA Fairfax Seniors were invited to participate in a virtual interview for the blog. Today we are happy to celebrate graduating senior, Mahlia Parsons!

When did you start school at BFA?
I first started school here at BFA when my family moved to Fairfax six years ago.

What is your favorite memory about your time at BFA?
The opportunity to travel to China in 2018 is an experience I will never forget. I was able to go into the schools there, connect with the students, and sit in on a few of their classes. Every person we met was so welcoming and just as excited to meet us as we were them. To get to meet the students, staff, and learn about the education system in their country was so unique and engaging. Some of the students I met while there I am still in contact with to this day, two years later.  

What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation I will be attending Castleton University as a part of the Honors College in the fall where I will be majoring in Political Science. 

Do you want to give a “shout-out” to one of your teachers? Who and why?
Ms. Thorsen. Not only is she a wonderful person, she was the first to tell me to push myself to greater heights I didn’t know were even possible for me to achieve. Her wisdom and guidance in both the realms of school and life have been invaluable and I am so fortunate to have had her as a teacher and mentor over the years. 

What are you learning about yourself as a result of the coronavirus-related shifts in your life? How have you come to learn these things?
I am coming to see that I am a self-starter, one that will not rest until things are completed to the best of my ability, and earlier than the given deadline. I don’t need to be in a classroom setting to have the motivation to complete my work with the same urgency and level of effort had the closure not have happened. The desire to continue to challenge myself to produce the same quality work as I would in a traditional setting has made itself evident and it is something I look to take with me wherever I go. 

What new learning and new perspectives have you gained and how will you integrate them into your life moving forward?
The one thing I can say I have learned from all this is that we all must be grateful for what we have, where we are, and the people in our lives as tomorrow is not guaranteed. There is so much uncertainty in the world right now that it has given me a new appreciation for those who have supported me and helped me get to where I am today. I am making sure now more than ever to let people know what they mean to me and how much I appreciate them.  

Linda Keating is the Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment at Franklin West Supervisory Union. She is a regular contributor to THE FWSU STORY. You can follow her on Twitter @Educate4ward

The FWSU Story: Fletcher Students Grow Hope by Planting Seeds

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Fletcher Elementary School students are growing both hope and vegetables thanks to a collaboration with the Northwest Healthy Roots Collaborative and RiseVT.

Fletcher Elementary School students Connor Macaulay, grade 2, Cailin Macaulay, grade 4, Patrick Lawton, grade 2 and kindergartener Cole Lawton, prepare to plant bean seeds they they received as part of a distance-learning collaboration between the school and local wellness groups. The project aims to connect students throughout Franklin and Grand Isle Counties and teach about healthy, sustainable and local foods. 

On May 7, Fletcher Elementary families received packages of bean seeds to be grown at home, along with instructions for inside and outside planting, links to gardening videos, seed sprouting ideas and additional activities for at-home learning that teaches children about soil types, animals that live underground, the soil cycle and how to begin creating their own soil through composting. 

One of the goals of the project is to create a sense of unity between Fletcher students and other Franklin and Grand Isle County students who are participating in a common activity, despite being separated by the school dismissal. Additionally, the project aims to help students understand the importance of a resilient local food system where families are connected to, and nourished by, local farms and food.

“There has never been a more important time for our communities to feel connected, healthy and hopeful,” Rachel Huff, of the Healthy Roots Collaborative’s Farm to School Program, said. “We feel planting a seed is one of the greatest ways to place hope in a positive future. We hope by growing this small bit of food at home students can feel grounded and in control in these ungrounded times.”

According to Huff, sparking an interest in the local food system and eating healthy food through hands-on, authentic learning is also an essential part of the project. A total of 3000 seed packets are being distributed to children in Franklin and Grand Isle Counties.

“The act of growing things, particularly plants that produce food in the end, is a rich and meaningful experience for kids,” Fletcher’s third and fourth grade teacher, Tracey Godin, said. “Academically, it promotes scientific and mathematical observations and processes that will strengthen students’ abilities to be critical thinkers. Students learn to care for the plants and understand their needs, which promotes responsibility, and they look forward to the end result of their hard work. With this project, it also gives them a sense of unity with other children and families in our area in a time when we have to be apart.”

Godin’s classroom has participated in a multi-year partnership with the Healthy Roots Collaborative that has brought them to local farms and introduced farmers into the classroom.

The Northeast Healthy Roots Collaborative is a regional food systems program supporting the growers, producers and consumers in Franklin and Grand Isle County. They provide food-related education, access and infrastructure. RiseVT is a wellness program based at Northwestern Medical Center that encourages wellness through healthy food choices and physical activity.

Christopher Dodge is the Principal of Fletcher Elementary School and is a regular contributor to THE FWSU STORY. You can follow him on Twitter @FletcherFalcon

The FWSU Story: Learning Together, Learning Apart (Part 5)

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In mid-March all FWSU teachers, along with all Vermont teachers, said good-bye to their students, not knowing it would be for the remainder of the school year. In record time, they adjusted the goals of learning to fit a new, remote landscape, which was unfamiliar territory for all. Their work has been nothing short of amazing. Their hopes and dreams for their students to be engaged learners remain at the core of every choice they make. Over the next several weeks, we’ll profile some of our teachers from our 3 schools who have volunteered to share some of their experiences. 
These are their FWSU Stories. 
This is the fifth installment in the series.

Allison MacKenzie, GEMS Grade 3 Elementary Teacher

Clouds and silver linings…
The greatest loss I have felt in this experience has been the lack of in-person connection to my students and colleagues. Amazingly enough, I miss the jolt that my morning alarm clock gave me each day — that feeling that my own children and my students are depending on me to guide them through the day. I long for that urgency I felt in the early hours of the morning that demanded a certain routine that has changed significantly. I miss greeting my team-mates and co-workers in the hallway and the morning exchanges we would share about our lives. I miss seeing all of our students’ faces come into the building each day to greet us in their chosen way. The community that is built in the walls of a classroom is truly amazing. I miss that. Teachers and students develop relationships with one another that allow us to gauge each other’s moods and needs for the day so that we can respond accordingly. I miss that sense of knowing what is going on for them. The greatest silver lining is that we work in a district that values the social and emotional well-being of our students above all else. I still feel the presence of that value every day. I feel that we have remained connected as a school community and that we are still doing our very best to respond to our students’ needs and to be there for them through this trying time. I am incredibly impressed by the work their families are doing to keep them connected and engaged.

Looking forward…
I really can’t wait for that first day when we can all be together again. When I think about our first day together, I am most looking forward to simply greeting everyone. I know that moment when students re-enter school is going to be one of the most amazing experiences I will have had as an educator. I have always loved and appreciated being able to do this work, but I appreciate it on a completely different level now. We have been asking ourselves, our students, and our families to be patient. We have sent the message that we are all in this together and that we will get through this. One of my favorite quotes that was shared by another teacher in a video GEMS made was “Every storm runs out of rain.”  I think it’s going to be incredibly powerful for all of us, students and staff alike, to know that we did, in fact get through this…that this “storm ran out of rain” and that we are all together again.  

Hopes and dreams…
My biggest hope for my students is that they stay happy and healthy. I hope that they talk about their feelings and that they reach out for support when they need it. I hope they remember to breathe fresh air everyday and to smile.

I hope they stay engaged with school as much as they can. I hope they find the value in helping out at home.  I hope they continue to learn.

Linda Keating is the Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment at Franklin West Supervisory Union. She is a regular contributor to THE FWSU STORY. You can follow her on Twitter @Educate4ward

The FWSU Story: Learning Together, Learning Apart (Part 4)

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In mid-March all FWSU teachers, along with all Vermont teachers, said good-bye to their students, not knowing it would be for the remainder of the school year. In record time, they adjusted the goals of learning to fit a new, remote landscape, which was unfamiliar territory for all. Their work has been nothing short of amazing. Their hopes and dreams for their students to be engaged learners remain at the core of every choice they make. Over the next several weeks, we’ll profile some of our teachers from our 3 schools who have volunteered to share some of their experiences. 
These are their FWSU Stories. 
This is the fourth installment in the series.

Sara Villeneuve, BFA Fairfax High School English Teacher

Clouds and silver linings…

My regrets are really for my seniors. As a class of 2020 advisor, my heart breaks for their missed experiences. Prom, class trip, spring sports, drama festival, class day, alumni banquet….there are so many events that mark the end of the year and focus on celebrating our seniors. This class has had a challenging four years of school…they are the first class to graduate with proficiencies and we have “tested” out all sorts of new initiatives with them. They are so resilient and willing to roll with the punches. This blow just feels like too much. They will be the first class to finish school under a Stay at Home order. I know we will do everything that we can to celebrate these students as a school and as a community. It has forced us all to focus on the things that are really most important. I love their creative thinking and ingenuity. No doubt, they will design the most unique graduation ever. I will never forget them!

So much to miss….

I sincerely miss being with students and colleagues everyday. I am an extrovert so I always love being around people! I thrive on the social interactions of education. I miss seeing people in the hallway, laughing with students, and chatting with colleagues. I think learning is a very social process and I try to design my courses with a lot of student engagement, discussion, and peer interaction. Remote learning has made this very challenging. I love it when we can have our “Online Video Classes”. Just seeing my students laugh, interact, ask questions, and talk about their learning brightens my week. I miss my classes, NHS meetings, Coffee House planning…all the other fun stuff that’s also part of my job at BFA. 

Hopes and dreams…

My biggest hopes are that all of our students and their families stay safe and healthy and that our world will be able to return to normal soon. I hope we can all look back on this and find we learned just how strong we are as individuals and as a community. I see the hard work, dedication, and thoughtfulness of our students, parents, and town(s). Everyone is doing their best to get through this difficult time. I hope students will recognize their personal growth and tenacity. 

Jensen Welch, BFA Fairfax High School Math Teacher

Things have changed…

The greatest loss is the daily interactions I get to have with my students and colleagues, the interactions students get to have with their peers, and the social learning and non-verbal communication that takes place in all those interactions. I’m continually telling my high school students that they must communicate with me using their words how they are feeling because we are no longer in a room together where I can read their facial expressions or body language to see if they are having a good or bad day or see if they understand the math we are doing or not. The greatest silver-lining for me personally has been finding the time to exercise more! Each morning when I might have been heading to the shower, getting ready for work, and then out the door to school, I’ve instead been heading outside for a run or walk, or I’ve been doing some online yoga.  More exercise has made my heart and my head happier and healthier. 

And changes are stressful…

It was very stressful at the beginning of the school dismissal when the information and the expectations were changing so rapidly. Everyone was doing their best to adapt and modify on the fly, but the whiplash of the situation coupled with the sense of loss was overwhelming at times. Luckily, I think we’ve all settled into more of a routine. The other stress that has not gone away despite a routine being established is the challenge of being a working parent. It is hard trying to find balance and harmony in doing my job, guiding my own children through their remote schooling, and finding time to also do fun family activities. I was pretty good at compartmentalizing my “home” world and my “work” world before, and now everything is all jumbled, so I’m switching from responding to a student email one minute, to asking my youngest daughter how many ways she can break apart 9 the next minute…it is distracting for all of us. But I think everyone has been super patient and understands how challenging this is for all.

Hopes and fears…

My hopes for my students are that they gain some confidence in themselves and see how much they actually know and how much they can accomplish on their own. I’ve been so impressed with most students as they continue to work through content, ask questions, revise practice work, and they just keep going! They should all be super proud of themselves! I am of course then worried about those few students who I have not heard a lot from. For some I can’t address from afar the barriers they are facing that are preventing them from doing their school work; for others I seem unable to motivate and support them without being face-to-face. For a few I’ve been able to reconnect with, I think they appreciate the extra effort teachers make when we reach out individually, and the accommodations we’ve made to help make sure they can be successful from home. I am less worried about the academic progress of these students and more worried that they are feeling disconnected from their peers and a supportive school environment. But I believe in resilience and hope everyone is finding their way through this health crisis.

Linda Keating is the Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment at Franklin West Supervisory Union. She is a regular contributor to THE FWSU STORY. You can follow her on Twitter @Educate4ward

The FWSU Story: Teacher Appreciation Week

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Dear Educator:

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week! Thank you for all you do to support the students and families across FWSU. 

We are in difficult times and you have risen to meet the ever-changing challenges. On any given ordinary day the number of tasks you take on, both big and small, to support students is huge. Now, add to that remote teaching and learning. Teachers are truly amazing people.

As I write this I cannot stop thinking about the teachers I had growing up. Teachers who believed in me, supported me, and challenged me. Teachers who gave me direction for my life, and who are the reason I became an educator. You are doing that with your students. You are making a difference!

I encourage you to take this week to pause and reflect on the difference you are making. This is especially important in our current situation, where your creativity, patience, and dedication has shown through. 

“Promise me you’ll always remember: You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” 

~Christopher Robin to Pooh, A.A. Milne

Thank you for all you do!

Sincerely,

Donald S. Van Nostrand
Interim Superintendent