The FWSU Story: State Police Become Engaged Community Partners in Fletcher

Students at Fletcher Elementary School had an opportunity to break bread with a member of the “green and gold” last week. The visit was part of an effort by Sgt. Michael Aamodt, of the St. Albans State Police, to connect his Troopers with local schools.

The school visit was conducted by Trooper Benjamin Weed, who ate lunch with students, toured the school and spent time talking with preschoolers about his law enforcement responsibilities. 

“What I appreciated about him coming to our school was that the kids got to see him outside of a crisis. It helps children become familiar with law enforcement in a positive way and helps them to be more likely to call on the police if they need help,” Math and Literacy Interventionist Lorrene Palermo said. 

The visit aligned with the Franklin West Supervisory Union’s action plan goal that states, “FWSU staff and students engage in authentic learning opportunities with local, regional, state and global partners to make a difference in their community, state and world.” 


“We want our students to be comfortable and trusting of law enforcement,” Instructional Coach Denette Locke said. “We want them to know that these skilled, caring, helping people are here to keep everyone safe. It’s only logical that those relationships begin proactively at school, where kids already feel safe.”

“It was really fun having lunch with the police officer,” first grader Summer Campbell said. “They are usually really busy catching bad guys and it was special that he took time to be here with us. It makes me feel more comfortable here at school and I also know I can get help in other places, too.”

“We are really thankful that our law enforcement partners are taking time from their very busy work to be part of our schools,” Superintendent Ned Kirsch said. “Their presence alone helps to build an increased sense of safety and developing early relationships between students and helping professionals will make it easier and more likely that our kids will access the support they need later in life.”

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